What is Diminished Value?

What is Diminished Value?So you’ve been in an accident that wasn’t your fault, and your vehicle was damaged. The other party’s insurance company agreed to pay the claim and repaired the car back to road worthy condition. In many ways, you don’t see any difference between the vehicle before the accident and the vehicle after the repair, but it’s still not the same. And in the eyes of appraisers, car dealerships, potential buyers and the IRS, it is most certainly not the same.

You may have seen advertisements discussing full background reports about vehicles for sale at dealerships. This is perhaps the best way to understand what inherent diminished value means to you. If you were shopping for a vehicle and found two cars of the exact same make and model at your dealership, with similar mileage and features, you would want to know if one of the cars had been in an accident and required substantial repairs. While the dealer assures you that the car is just as good as the vehicle that did not need repairs, you would likely prefer the car that had not been in an accident.

This is a common reaction. Most buyers report that they would not buy a car that had been in an accident, or would at least only consider purchasing the vehicle at a heavily discounted price. Some worry that repairs may not have been done properly, or that aftermarket parts were used in the repair. Others worry that some damage may have gone unnoticed, or that the car will need unexpected repairs in the future. Their worries may even extend to insurance companies – if this car is totaled, your insurance company will pay less because of the accident history.

Calculate Diminished ValueA certified appraisal can help clear up some of the mystery and confusion involved in these concerns. AAG compares recent sale prices of damaged and repaired vehicles to those that have not sustained damage or been in an accident. These comparables make it possible to determine a percentage of loss for an inherent diminished value claim and to assess the loss of value due. An appraiser can also accurately determine if repairs were done poorly or were not performed to industry standards which might lead to additional repairs. Certified appraisals consider frame damage or the use of non-OEM parts in repairs which could contribute to an even greater loss of value.

You may wonder how you will use this information, and what it means to you. The obvious effects of diminished value is the influence on price, whether you are buying or selling a vehicle. You may also need this information in court if you are not at fault and unable to reach an amicable settlement. Compensation for damages to personal property should include the difference between the vehicle’s original value and the post-repair value in addition to the cost of repairs. You may also be able to claim an amount of loss as a deduction using IRS tax form 4684. Acquiring an accurate assessment of diminished value can save you money and make sure you receive what you deserve in settlements and claim fulfillment.

To get the most accurate diminished value claim for your vehicle, contact the Auto Appraisal Group and get everything you’re entitled to receive.